Protect Yourself from COVID-19 Vaccine-Related Cyberattacks and Scams

 
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As COVID-19 coronavirus vaccines are being distributed worldwide, fraudsters are once again attempting to capitalize by selling illegal or counterfeit goods, conducting phishing, targeting unsuspecting users with malware, and other scams.
 

The FTC has provided three ways to avoid COVID-19 vaccine scams. Here’s what you can be sure of:

  1. You can’t pay to put your name on a list to get the vaccine. That’s a scam.
  2. You can’t pay to get early access to the vaccine. That’s a scam.
  3. Nobody legit will call about the vaccine and ask for your Social Security, bank account or credit card number. That’s a scam.

Ignore any vaccine offers that say different, or ask for personal or financial information. Learn more at https://www.ftc.gov/coronavirus/scams-consumer-advice
 

Here’s how you can protect yourself:

  • Beware of any message that communicates a tremendous sense of urgency and attempts to rush you into purchasing/reserving a COVID-19 vaccine for yourself and your family
  • Be extremely cautious on social media. Do not click links to vaccine sites or “click bait” types of articles, even if they appear to come from trusted sources
  • Avoid clicking on links in unsolicited emails and be wary of email attachments. Do not reveal personal or financial information in email, and do not respond to email solicitations for this information
  • If you receive spam emails or texts – meaning any from sites/lists you do not already subscribe to, and in some cases those that appear to be forwarded from a friend – do not open them, or click on any links or attachments inside
  • Be very suspicious of unexpected phone calls, emails and text messages that pretend to be a government organization urging you to take immediate action.

Safe places to look for COVID-19 Vaccine information

Rather than clicking on social media links when looking for the latest information on the vaccines, simply open your web browser and go directly to sites you trust – such as legitimate, government websites: Center for Disease Control(CDC.gov) and World Health Organization(Who.int).